Faculty
Prof. Manoochehr Shirzaei       
shirzaei@asu.edu 
ratlab.asu.edu

RaTLab friend
Prof. Susanna werth
swerth@asu.edu

hydrogeodesylab.asu.edu

Postdoctoral Researcher
Dr. Chandrakant Ojha
cojha1@asu.edu

Remote sensing of large scale crustal deformation in California due to depletion in water resources
States across southwest USA, in particular California, are currently undergoing a severe drought on large spatial extents, which causes shrinkage of the surface and groundwater resources and severe subsidence on the surface. A comprehensive monitoring schemes to enhance drought management and mitigating the negative impacts at various spatial and temporal scales is an essential. The research effort will focus on acquisition of a high resolution 3D deformation map obtained through InSAR processing of SAR images acquired by various satellites (2003-present) and GPS measurements over the state of California. Results from this project will assess the capabilities of InSAR to monitor aquifer systems and of a combination with GRACE gravity data to acquire high resolution spatiotemporal observations of TWS variations.


Graduate student and NASA Fellow
Megan M. Miller

megan.m.miller@asu.edu

Remote sensing of land subsidence and hydrological properties across Arizona
This project focuses on using advanced InSAR deformation imaging to fully illuminate surface and anthropogenic processes that act in concert to produce complex surface deformation fields in major Arizonian cities, including Phoenix and Tucson. InSAR data from a number of spacecraft with L, C and X-band SAR instruments, spanning a period of more than twenty years, will be combined in a rigorous analysis and interpretation effort to improve our understanding of aquifer system, poroelastic effects, and associated hazards in the region. I will also propose acquisition of UAVSAR repeat-pass interferometry to capture details of three-dimensional deformation associated with heterogeneous land subsidence and uplift over basins. The UAVSAR system also provides the capability to rapidly respond to small and large natural and anthropogenic deformation events that occur during my study. I will explore, interpret and model both spatial and temporal details in the deformation field and the underlying processes.

 


Graduate student
Guang Zhai (Gavin)
gzhai@asu.edu


Time-dependent deformation source model of Kilauea volcano obtained via InSAR time series and inversion modeling
The Kilauea volcano, Hawaii Island, is one of the most active volcanoes worldwide. Its complex system including magma reservoirs and rift zones, provides a unique opportunity to investigate the dynamics of magma transport and supply. The relatively shallow magma reservoir beneath the caldera stores magma prior to eruption at the caldera or migration to the rift zones. Additionally, the temporally variable pressure in the magma reservoir causes changes in the stress field, driving dike propagation and occasional intrusions at the eastern rift zone. Thus constraining the time-dependent evolution of the magma reservoir plays an important role in understanding magma processes such as supply, storage, transport and eruption.

Graduate student and NASA Fellow
Mostafa Khoshmanesh
mkhoshma@asu.edu


Mechanism of slow slip events on San Andreas fault: constraints from geodesy and seismology

This project focuses on investigating spatial and temporal evolution of fault creep and underlying mechanism on the central San Andreas Fault (CSAF) by using a combination of geodetic and seismic data set through a time-dependent modeling scheme. It will use advanced InSAR imaging to fully explore 3D surface deformation and faulting processes along CSAF. InSAR data from a number of spacecraft with L- and C-band SAR instruments, spanning a period of more than two decades, will be combined with GPS, and seismic data in a rigorous analysis and interpretation effort to improve our understanding of the fault kinematics. We also test several viable hypothesis explaining the causes of fault creep and its rate changes in the form of slow slip events.



Graduate student
Grace Carlson
gacarls1@asu.edu

Remote sensing and modeling of total water storage variations in California
States across southwest USA, in particular California, are currently undergoing a severe drought on large spatial extents, which causes shrinkage of the surface and groundwater resources. Thus, a comprehensive monitoring and modeling schemes to enhance drought management and mitigating the negative impacts at various spatial and temporal scales is an essential. The proposed research effort will perform a joint analysis of the deformation and gravity data to obtain maps of TWS variations, on various scales ranging from 100s of m to 1000s of km. We will combine the archive of gravity data obtained by GRACE satellites (2002-present) with high resolution 3D deformation data based on InSAR and GPS measurements over the state of California. A combination through a Bayesian inverse modeling scheme will provide multiscale estimates of water storages variations and its uncertainty. Thus it delivers unique constraints on the timing and extent of hydrological mass fluxes, useful for probabilistic drought forecast and management. Results from this project will assess the capabilities of InSAR in combination with GRACE and GPS data to provide high resolution spatiotemporal observations of TWS variations.